Environmental Conservation

Everything You Need to Know About Mid Contract Management for CRP

Natural wildlands are good at caring for themselves (as long as they’re protected from outside dangers such as pollution, human-caused wildfires, etc). Wind, rain, animal grazing, and other events help maintain a balance. In grasslands, for example, these natural disturbances remove excess woody vegetation and allow flowering plants to reseed and thrive.  While CRP aims to recreate natural habitat by establishing native CRP seed, it requires a more hands-on approach to stay on …

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What to Know About the New CP-43 – Prairie Strip Practice

Have you ever wished you could enjoy the environment-enriching benefits of CRP without taking entire fields out of active production? Then you might be interested in the new CP-43 – Prairie Strip practice.  CP-43 falls under CRP’s CLEAR initiative, which we talked about last week. Like all CLEAR practices, CP-43 places a special emphasis on reducing runoff and …

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Reducing Runoff and Protecting Water with the CRP CLEAR Initiative

There are three primary goals of the Conservation Reserve Program: improve soil health, protect water supplies, and restore wildlife habitat. While all practices under CRP work together to achieve these goals, many of them place a specific emphasis on a particular goal.  Last month, we discussed CRP SAFE, which focuses on establishing and restoring wildlife habitat.  Today, we’d like …

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Supporting Local Hunting with CRP

We talk a lot about the environmental benefits of CRP and for good reason. Through CRP, farmers and landowners receive money from the government to take marginal land out of active production. They then establish native vegetation, which restores soil health, reduces runoff, and protects local water supplies.  That alone would be worth enrolling in …

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Can CRP Fix the Gulf of Mexico’s Hypoxic Zone?

At this very moment, the Mississippi River is pouring excess nitrogen and phosphorus into the Gulf of Mexico, feeding the 8th largest hypoxic zone in the world. Hypoxia is when a body of water lacks the oxygen necessary to sustain life. Any marine life in this dead area is forced to either flee or die.  Considering the prominent role the Gulf of Mexico plays for 5 US …

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How Agriculture is Contributing to The Gulf of Mexico’s Hypoxic Zone

There’s a dead zone growing in the Gulf of Mexico. Located off the Louisiana-Texas coastline, this murky blight is causing marine life to either flee or die in mass. Left unchecked, it could cause irreversible harm to local economies that depend on fishing and water-based activities.   What’s to blame for the creation of this hypoxic zone? The simple answer is the Mississippi River. The Mississippi discharges …

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Understanding the Gulf of Mexico’s Hypoxic Zone

Spanning the shores of 5 US states and 6 Mexican states, the Gulf of Mexico is 10th largest body of water in the world, excluding oceans. It acts as a vital resource to both of its bordering countries, providing food, sport, oil, and more. Today, the Gulf of Mexico faces a growing threat that’s causing its waters to darken as marine life either leaves or …

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Improving Soil Health with Native Grasses and Forbs

Healthy soil is a critical component for life on this planet. Not only does it grow our plants and crops, but it absorbs rainfall, decomposes organisms and waste, and stores over 4 trillion tons of carbon. Forests, by comparison, only store around 360 billion tons (learn more about the importance of carbon sequestration here.)  Though soil is often viewed as an …

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